The Horror of the Inexpressible: Misophonia in Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher”

For my psychoanalytic theory paper, I apply the theory of Jacques Lacan to Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher.” Instead of completely relying on the psychoanalytic theory to dissect the text, I also apply a modern diagnosis to Roderick Usher’s condition: Misophonia. The fact that the condition was unnamed at the time increases the intensity of his madness and therefore adds to the frustration of repressed desires. Using the symptoms and description of Misophonia to further define Usher’s madness, I am able to apply Lacan’s theory and clearly show the effects of repressing the failed use of language and Roderick’s desire to express his agitation.

Psychoanalytic theory naturally captivates me. Anything that concentrates on the darker processes of the mind holds my attention beyond any other topic of study. With the modern-day Misophonia diagnosis of Usher, I was challenged with performing psychoanalytic theory on the work but also incorporating the definition of a rather new mental disorder. I embraced the challenge with enthusiasm and really enjoyed revising my psychoanalytic theory paper until I believe it showcased my argument most clearly.

The Horror of the Inexpressible: Misophonia in Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher”